New York State is welcoming the new year with a new minimum wage.

If you're a minimum wage worker in New York State, there's good news. New York State has officially increased its minimum wage statewide. According to the Democrat and Chronicle, the increase depends on the area in which you live and which industry you work in. This new increase is part of New York State's plan to eventually have a statewide minimum wage of $15.

According to the Democrat and Chronicle, there are two categories of minimum wages: general and tipped. The general minimum wage applies to most workers. the tipped minimum wage applies to people who work in hospitality or restaurants. As of December 31, 2020, the tipped minimum wage does not apply to workers at nail salons, car washes, doormen, and other fields that the state now classifies as miscellaneous. These workers now receive the general minimum wage. There is also a separate wage for fast-food workers.

The Democrat and Chronicle reports the general minimum wage in New York City has remained the same at $15. This has been the minimum wage in New York City since 2019. The general minimum wage in Westchester County and Long Island has increased from $13 an hour to $14 an hour. For the rest of New York State, the general minimum wage has increased to $12.50 from $11.80.

The tipped minimum wage has also increased in New York State. The Democrat and Chronicle reports that food service workers in New York City now have a minimum wage of $10 an hour and $12.50 for service workers. In Westchester County and Long Island, the minimum wage for food service workers is $9.35 and $11.65 for service workers. For the rest of New York State, the minimum wage is $8.35 for food service workers and $10.40 for service workers.

In New York State, the minimum wage for fast-food workers has also increased, according to the Democrat and Chronicle. The minimum wage for fast-food workers is still $15 in New York City. For the rest of the state, the fast-food minimum wage is now $14.50, up from $13.75.

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