You might be living with or even using items that have expired. In most cases, the following items won't bring you harm if you are using them, but you might want to toss them just to be on the safe side.

  • Shampoo & Conditioner. These have a shelf life of three years unopened and about one year opened. Even less time if you store them in the shower where water can get into the bottles and dilute them.
  • Your slippers. Unless you wash them on a regular basis, you will want to get a new pair every year, because you can carry infectious germs on your feet which will live a happy life in your slippers.
  • Pillows. Yes, pillows have an expiration date. You have about 2 to 3 years for a pillow, even less if they have lost their plushness and they no longer support your head.
  • Toothbrushes. Ok, you might know about this one. Dentists will tell you to replace your toothbrush every three months, even more often if you have been sick.
  • Bras. Ok ladies, how long do you hang on to a bra? Believe it or not, eight months is the average life expectancy of your bra. So those ones that you have had in the back of your drawer, you might want to rethink those. Plus, do they really still support you?
  • Loofahs or Body Scrubbers. The life of these little guys is about two months. You can wash it with your clothes or even wet it and then place it in the microwave for 30 to 60 seconds, this will help to kill any germs that are making it their home.
  • Beer. Believe it or not you are looking at about 4 months from the time that you bought it to the time it is not longer as great as you remember. But seriously, who has beer longer than 4 months?
  • Ketchup. If it is unopened, you have one year from the time you bought it. Check the date on the bottle. If it is opened, go by the best by date and keep it in the refrigerator.

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